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Category: Android change file permissions without root

Android change file permissions without root

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I am attempting to change permissions for the folder which is inside Data folder in Internal Storage. I also went to root of System partition and mounted it to RW. However when I try to change the permissions of a file or folder inside internal storage or even SD Card, I get the following error. Please note that some file systems do not allow permission changes.

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Explored for a while with different file managers. Here's what I tried and observed. If you want to change the permission of file in your internal storage then just open root explorer I assume it already rooted and navigate to.

For more info go through this.

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Learn more. Asked 3 years, 9 months ago. Active 2 years, 11 months ago. Viewed 36k times. I next checked for which folders these options are available. Here is what I observed. Checked multiple folders within them. These options ARE available. These options are NOT available. What is the issue? How can I change the permissions for that folder? Blogs ShaQ. Blogs 1, 4 4 gold badges 14 14 silver badges 25 25 bronze badges. I resolved this myself. I was looking at the wrong folder.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service.

Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. I tried doing it on my un-rooted device, i tried changing the permission but nothing happened.

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Learn more. Asked 3 years, 9 months ago. Active 3 years, 9 months ago.

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Viewed 1k times. Vishal Singh Vishal Singh 19 8 8 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes.

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Ask Ubuntu is a question and answer site for Ubuntu users and developers. It only takes a minute to sign up. If a User A owns file. When i run a chown B file. It seems to me that since User A owns the file, they ought to be able to change the ownership, but I don't see a way to do it. Thanks for the help! If the User A owns file. This is a feature and not a bug. And one of the many reasons why the elders chose to put this feature in, has been explained in a comment to your question by roadmr.

No, you cannot change the owner a file without access, but if you own the file, you can change the permissions of the file with chmod and may change the group with chgrp to another group you a member of. Related Question: chown is allowed to non root user?

android change file permissions without root

If you also have access to user A, you could then log in and delete the original file. And finally rename the copied file, to the original name again as Bleaving you with essentially the same file, owned by a different user.

Obviously is not the SAME file, but if you only cared about the contents of the file, this does the trick. The trick is to simply copy whatever it is, delete the original then move your copy into its place. This, unfortunately, involves making a full-on copy of everything, but what do you do.

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android change file permissions without root

Is it possible to change ownership of a file without root access? Ask Question. Asked 8 years, 6 months ago. Active 1 year, 11 months ago.

Guide to Edit Build.prop File on Android Without Root

Viewed 54k times. Trent 2 2 bronze badges. Daniel Daniel 1 1 gold badge 2 2 silver badges 9 9 bronze badges. You could put incriminating data in a file and change its ownership to frame someone : I guess that's one argument against allowing what you suggest. Small addition: AFAIU you can change the owning group of a file that you own, provided that you're a member of the group you're changing to.

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How to get root access on Android

Nitin Venkatesh Nitin Venkatesh Part of this wrong. Non-root users can change the group other groups they are a member of.Editing your hosts file the file that maps hostnames to IP addresses, for those of you who were previously unawareis useful for everything from controlling access to websites and network traffic to just mapping addresses to names.

Whether you're a developer looking to make some DNS tweaks or just a concerned parent looking to block certain sites from their kids, hosts file modifications have got you covered. You can go about this process in two ways, depending on whether or not your Android device of choosing is rooted.

How to modify the hosts file on your Android device

While the process isn't exactly rocket science on a non-rooted device either, it's definitely more straightforward on devices that have been rooted. If you don't already have ADB, you can grab it from Google's developer resource page. Connect your device to your computer via USB make sure you've already enabled USB debugging in the developer settings.

Run the command adb devices to ensure your device is connected, and that ADB is reading and interacting with your device appropriately. Now, simply navigate to the directory which you copied the hosts file to, and edit away! Remember, once you're done you need to push the file back to your device. This method is nowhere near as lengthy and should take you less than 5 minutes, even if you're a slow tapper.

Open your file manager of choice we recommend a file manager like Solid Exploreras it allows for easy adjustments and modifications to read and write permissions.

How to Manage and Fix Permissions on Android File System

Select "Group" under write permissions. You should now have sufficient permissions to modify and overwrite the hosts file. Reboot your device and navigate to the hosts file again using your file manager. Select it, press "More" and tap the "Open" option.

You will need a text editor with Superuser access, like TurboEditor. A whole host of interesting things excuse the pun. Everything from speeding up lookups for specific servers with static IPs by adding a custom host to restricting certain servers from sending info to and from your phone — hosts file modifications have it all.

There are more specific guides on modifying your hosts file for specific purposes all over the web — this is a fairly universal element across operating systems so there's no lack of available aid. What do you guys think? Will you be modding your hosts file, and if so, why? Let us know in the comments, or tell us your thoughts over in our forums.When it comes to app permissions, Android takes an "all or nothing" approach. You have no granular control over what data apps can access, so the only way to prevent an app from seeing your location or starting up on boot, for instance, is to not install the app in the first place.

In the past, we've covered mods that will allow you to revoke individual permissions for your installed apps, but these all had one thing in common—they required root access. But a new app from developer Zack Wang takes a creative approach to this problem, and the end result is a granular permission control system that does not require root.

Essentially, the app can take any of your existing apps, then inject a wrapper into their coding that allows you to disable certain permissions. It's a rather ingenious solution, since its only requirement is that you've enabled Unknown sources in your phone's Security settings under. The no-root solution for managing app permissions on Android is called MoboClean formly called UU AppPurifierand it's available for free directly from the developer.

When you first launch MoboClean, you'll be given a chance to review the app's license agreement. Tap "Agree" on this message, then you'll be taken to the main menu. To begin revoking app permissions, tap the "Purify" button in the middle of the screen. From here, press the "Next" button, and you'll be taken to a list of all your installed apps. Using this menu, select any apps whose permissions you'd like to revoke, then press the "Purify" button at the bottom of the screen.

At this point, the app will go about working its magic. From a more technical standpoint, a wrapper that will provide a permission management interface is being injected into the APK installer file for the apps you've selected. Momentarily, MoboClean will ask you to uninstall the original copy of this app, then install the modified version immediately after.

So allow the app to inject its wrapper into the APK, then a system menu will appear asking you to uninstall the app that's being modified. Tap "OK" on this dialog box, but note that this app's existing data will be lost in the process, so you'll have to log back into any associated accounts later. Immediately after that's finished, another system menu will appear asking you to re-install this app.

When all apps have been purified, you'll be taken to the "Manage permissions" screen. From here, you can revoke the app's permissions to run on startup, hold a background process, or post new notifications.

Beneath these options, you can revoke privacy-related permissions. Just select a permission, then choose either "Prompt" or "Deny. When you're done modifying an app's permissions, tap "OK" at the bottom of the screen.

From here, you can select other apps to modify their permissions as well, but when you're finished, tap "Set All.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Android Enthusiasts Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for enthusiasts and power users of the Android operating system. It only takes a minute to sign up.

android change file permissions without root

Some file explorers like MiXplorer also have options to change Modified Time. You don't need super user privileges to change mtime. Only the file should be writeable by your user ID app in case of Android. In above commands debugfs is used with root privileges to get creation time of file on ext4 because some stat binaries aren't updated to use statx yet requires at least Linux Kernel 4. Common Linux filesystems like ext4 and f2fs support timestamps, including the emulated filesystems used by Android on SD cards.

Other OS and filesystems have similar concept with slightly different terminologies. Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Home Questions Tags Users Unanswered. How to change the modified date of a file without root? Ask Question. Asked 1 year, 4 months ago. Active 3 months ago. Viewed 2k times. Total Commander failed to do it with a permission error Access Denied. Reddy Lutonadio 4, 2 2 gold badges 8 8 silver badges 38 38 bronze badges.

Bernard Bernard 21 4 4 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes. DETAILS: touch uses utimensat to update time of access atime and modification mtime provided that filesystem supports the timestamps be saved in inode along with file's data. Irfan Latif Irfan Latif Sign up or log in Sign up using Google. Sign up using Facebook. Sign up using Email and Password. Post as a guest Name. Email Required, but never shown. The Overflow Blog.

Tales from documentation: Write for your clueless users. Podcast a conversation on diversity and representation. Featured on Meta.On any UNIX or Linux based file system like Android, all files and folders have a set of permissions associated with them.

Today, we will see what permissions Read-Write-Execute mean and how we can set or fix file permissions on Android using a root file manager app. You cannot taste the real flavor of the Lollipop, Marshmallow, Nougat, Oreo or Pie and the whole of Android kitchen unless you have root access on your phone or tablet.

The power vested onto you after rooting your device unlocks the doors of a new world, far away from millions of apps found at the Google Play and sluggish and faulty firmware updates, where customization and possibilities breath and grow to give you the next-level experience with your Android device. You can choose from a wide range of custom ROMs, mods, ports, Kernels, themes, and patches for your Android device and thus have things as you want them to be.

The Open Source attribute of Android allows thousands of developers across the world to contribute to its development. They work hard to produce stuff that makes our mobile experience richer and convenient. In several cases, such mods and ports require a little effort from us too. Since fixing permissions of an app involves entering the system of your device, the first and foremost requirement is to have root access on it.

If you have rooted your Android deviceyou are good to go. The next requirement is to install a good root file manager on your device. On any UNIX or Linux based file system, every single file and folder stored on the hard drive has a set of permissions associated with it.

The Read-Write-Execute attributes tell the system or server who is allowed to do what with a particular file. Android, being a Linux-based platform for mobile devices, also relies on this kind of permission rules in its system files. Follow the steps described below to manage Read, Write and Execute permissions of a file on Android devices. Please note that if you assign the wrong set of file permissions while copying an app or file on your rooted Android device, your phone might stick on a bootloop.

To fix this error, do as follows:. So here are the steps to do it:. Cheers, and keep visiting! How can I fix this PermissionMy device is Rooted. What I had did is I edited build. If anybody know the reasonPlease help. Pretty good article. There are a couple of things to note though.


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